Come and See Us When You Need an Oral Health Issue Diagnosed | Issaquah Dentist

When we speak of oral health, we are not simply referring to your teeth. We are also talking about your gums, lips, inside of your mouth (roof and sides) and your uvula (the little punching bag in the back of your throat). Many people do not realize that we, your dentists, are the first line of defense against many health problems you could have.

Dentists are trained to spot many conditions and diseases because many have symptoms that start in the mouth. Several cancers, for example, will show symptoms in your mouth first. There are childhood diseases that show up as spots inside the cheeks or turn your throat strawberry red, like strep throat.

Oddly, though dentists are trained to look for some of the things doctors are trained to look for, doctors are not trained to look for dental problems. Some diseases manifest themselves with a smell, for example, diabetes can smell fruity and kidney problems can leave you with sweet breath. Oral thrush can be the first symptom of HIV that is noticed. If you are anemic you don’t have enough iron, so your gums, lips, and tongue may be pale.

Diabetes shows up in the mouth with gums that are swollen or sore. If you are diabetic and untreated, you may notice that you get cold sores, have excessive dry mouth or you may develop fungal yeast infections or oral thrush. We can spot the signs and will discuss them with you.

If you have HIV, it may show up in your mouth first. You may get recurrent cold sores. You experience dry mouth and you could develop warts from the human papillomavirus. Celiac disease is yet another common illness that dentists find. It could manifest itself as a dry, burning feeling on your tongue and it can also show up as problems with the enamel on your teeth.

Dentists can also see cancer in your mouth. Most particularly we can see head, neck, mouth, and throat cancers. They could show up as swollen glands or sores near the cheeks. We also look for any abnormal red or white spots in your oral cavity as these too, could be signs of cancer.

For more information about dental examinations, call Dr. Sciabica in Issaquah, WA at 425-392-3900 or visit www.issaquahdentists.com.

Dr. Frank S. Sciabica proudly serves patients from Issaquah and all surrounding areas.

Can You Eat Regular Foods Following Getting Sealants? | Issaquah Dentist

Dental sealants help to protect your teeth from cavities. They do this by creating a barrier between the enamel and plaque, which is full of bacteria.

The molars have small grooves within the surface that can trap plaque and food particle, and since your toothbrush can’t remove them completely, they can get stuck there for a long time. Dental sealants can help, and after a relatively simple procedure, you’ll be able to start eating and drinking right away.

What to expect after dental sealants

After we’ve finished sealing your teeth, you can eat, drink, play, or work. There won’t be any restrictions. It may feel strange to bite into something at first due to the new sealant, but this sensation should go away in a few days. Soon, you won’t even know that you have the sealant. Regular dental appointments are still essential after your teeth are sealed.

Some patients believe that once they have sealants that their teeth are virtually immune to decay and other issues. That simply isn’t the case. You still need to brush and floss regularly, and regular appointments in our office allow us to check how your sealant is doing. Sealants don’t last forever, but they can effectively seal teeth for 10 years, and they can be replaced easily if they are damaged or chipped.

Foods to avoid

While they aren’t specific to dental sealants, there are some foods that you should avoid in order to maintain good oral health. These are foods that are especially sticky, hard, and chewy, including caramel, taffy, jawbreakers, hard candy, chewing gum, and gummy bears.

Are you interested in dental sealants for either yourself or your child? If so, contact our office today to learn more about your options. We will discuss the pros and cons of dental sealants to help you decide if they are right for you.

For more information about dental sealants, call Dr. Sciabica in Issaquah, WA at 425-392-3900 or visit www.issaquahdentists.com.

Dr. Frank S. Sciabica proudly serves patients from Issaquah and all surrounding areas.

Why You Need to Protect Your Gums When Pregnant | Issaquah Dentist

If you are pregnant, your calendar will likely fill up quickly with all of the things you need to do before the baby arrives. While this will likely include regular appointments with your doctor, it is important to remember your oral health during this time. Regular dental cleanings and some extra oral hygiene precautions can keep your mouth healthy.

Pregnancy Gingivitis

Pregnancy gingivitis is a result of hormonal changes that lead to issues in the mouth. Your gums may bleed easily and feel tender and swollen. These symptoms can begin at any time throughout a pregnancy and are a sign that your gums need extra care and attention.

Prematurity and Low Birth Weight

Unfortunately, some scientists believe that gum disease during pregnancy may be connected to bigger problems. There have been several scientific studies that found connections between periodontal disease and prematurity. This research found that women with gum disease may be at an increased risk for delivering babies prematurely or at a low-birth weight when compared to mothers with healthy gums.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that babies who weigh less than 5.5 pounds at birth could be at risk for learning disabilities, delayed motor skills, and other issues.

Preventing Adverse Complications

If you are pregnant and worried about these adverse outcomes, there are steps that you can take. Routine brushing and flossing – twice and once per day, respectively – is a necessity, and it is important to focus on the gums during your oral hygiene efforts. A periodontal evaluation may be useful to inspect the health of your gums, and you should monitor your gums frequently to look for any changes.

Maintaining good oral and gum health supports your overall health as well as the health of your baby. Call us today to set up an appointment so that we can help you to have a healthy pregnancy.

For more information about All-on-4 implants, call Dr. Sciabica in Issaquah, WA at 425-392-3900 or visit www.issaquahdentists.com.

Dr. Frank S. Sciabica proudly serves patients from Issaquah and all surrounding areas.

What We Look for Specifically During Dental Exams | Issaquah Dentist

Most people take their trip to the dentist for granted. They go in with the hope that they will hear they have no cavities and they will walk away with a new toothbrush and an appointment to return in 6 months.

They do not really pay attention to what we are doing during the exam and the rest of their appointment. It is not a bad thing to learn about if you want to improve your oral health.

Before the Exam

While most people think that the most important work we do is during the actual exam, the work we do before that is just as important. We start out by looking at the history we have for our patients. This includes looking for any issues that could signal potential problems with oral health. We look at the risk factors to know what to pay attention to during the exam.

We also want to look at the x-rays and notes from previous exams. We are going to look to see if there are any changes that signal a potential issue.

During the Exam

During the exam we are looking for more than changes. We look for signs of any bacterial growth that could lead to a build-up of plaque. We also look at the positioning of the teeth and gums. We search for gaps and pockets that may form and can cause a problem.

We look for any discoloration of the teeth or spots on the teeth =that are a sign of tooth decay. We are looking for the same signs that a patient can look for at home that the health of their teeth and gums are at risk.

We also rely on x-rays to look at the structure of the teeth and gums. We are trying to spot problems before they become a bigger issue. Our goal is to make sure we can treat any issues as easily as possible.

The goal of our offices is to prevent problems before they occur. During an office visit, we will do this and then give you the treatments and tools needed for optimal oral health.

Contact our office today to schedule your next visit.

For more information about dental exams, call Dr. Frank S. Sciabica in Issaquah, WA at 425-392-3900 or visit www.issaquahdentists.com.

Dr. Sciabica proudly serve patients from Issaquah and all surrounding areas.

If You Struggle with Depression, Your Teeth May Show It | Issaquah Dentist

In recent years, scientific research has discovered a close link between your oral health and your overall health. There are many conditions we can identify during a visual examination of your oral cavity, even if you don’t know you suffer from them.

This includes mental health problems such as depression. Recent studies suggest that depression conclude depression is closely related to poor oral health.

Signs of Depression in Your Oral Health

When someone is depressed, they lose interest in everyday activities, and in many cases, the person stops taking care of themselves, including neglecting his or her oral health in general. Not brushing your teeth twice daily and flossing at least once per day can be extremely detrimental to your mouth and set the stage for serious dental conditions in the future.

When you struggle with depression or other emotional condition your teeth will also suffer. Some signs of depression that will show in your teeth are:

  • General dental neglect. If you stop brushing and flossing your teeth regularly, you may have more cavities than usual, and your gums may be tender or swollen without the stimulation from brushing.
  • Periodontal disease. There is a close connection between depression and periodontal disease. Depression can affect your oral health through the salivary glands. When the production of saliva is restricted, you can have dry mouth which results in a higher risk for tooth decay.
  • Oral pain. Many people who have recurrent pain from conditions such as temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ) also suffer from depression. There is a clear connection between pain and depression, according to scientific studies.

Keeping your regular checkups will let us identify any potential problems that may develop in the future. If you struggle with depression, your teeth may show it at different levels. The health of your mouth, in general, will suffer from the effects of depression.

For more information about depression, call Dr. Frank S. Sciabica in Issaquah, WA at 425-392-3900 or visit www.issaquahdentists.com.

Dr. Sciabica proudly serve patients from Issaquah and all surrounding areas.